AIP Paleo Ranch Crackers

After going without starches for so many years (in order to overcome autoimmune disease), it’s been so fun to be adding them back into my diet! I’ve been excited to finally get a chance to play around with plantains and cassava flour I’d seen other Paleo bloggers buzzing about in the past year or two. And these Paleo AIP Ranch Crackers are what came to be when I started mixing up these lovely starchy ingredients. I think these crackers do a pretty good job of satisfying that craving for snacky foods and ranch flavored goodness in an AIP sorta way.

AIP Paleo Ranch Crackers - vegan recipe

I get all of my organic spices and dried herbs from Mountain Rose Herbs, one of my most favorite companies on earth. Every time I place an order I feel like a kid at Christmas picking out my specialty organic (and very affordable!) dried dill, minced dried onion, vanilla bean powder, and the ingredients to make my Paleo Frappuccino and AIP Detox Coffee.

If ranch flavoring isn’t your thing – simply omit the vinegar, and seasonings and replace with your favorite herbs, like maybe rosemary, or a garlic and herb blend. If you are looking for an AIP cracker spread, I recommend this kale pesto. Or you can enjoy these crackers crumbled over a bowl of this comforting (AIP, vegan) cream of celery soup.

AIP Paleo Ranch Crackers - vegan recipe

AIP Paleo Ranch Crackers

Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes
Total Time 35 minutes
Servings 6 servings
Author Andrea Wyckoff

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup cassava flour
  • 1 large green plantain
  • 1/4 cup sustainable palm shortening - certified by ProFroest or any other oil or fat
  • 2 teaspoons white wine vinegar or any vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon dried onions
  • 1 teaspoondried dill
  • 1 teaspoon dried chives
  • 2 pinches sea salt
  • Tablespoon optional: 1 water add last only if needed

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 325*F.
  2. Puree green plantain with oil. I use this handy mini food processor / immersion blender.
  3. Spoon puree into a bowl. Stir in cassava flour a little at a time until the right consistency is achieved. You want a firm dough that hold together. It will take a few minutes of mixing to work the cassava flour in. I used by hands to really work the dough together, after the initial mixing.
  4. Add in remaining ingredients. Mix well.
  5. You can add a little spoonful of water if your dough is not sticking together well or seems to dry. But you don't want overly wet dough.
  6. Roll out dough in between 2 pieces of parchment paper. I divided dough into 2 batches to make rolling them out easier. Use a rolling pin (I used a smooth glass jar) to roll the dough out to thinly. Ideal thickness of dough is around 1/8" thick.
  7. Cut dough into squares. I used the edge of a spatula, and gently "sawed" through the dough to create smooth edges. I then used the tip of my favorite thin spatula to gently lift up on dough squares and separate them out on the parchment paper before baking. If you are having trouble lifting up on the crackers to spread them out, just leave them in place and make sure you have good thick cut out lines between each one, then you can break apart after baking (or even 1/2 way through baking.)
  8. Optional: use a fork to poke a few holes in each cracker so they look more cracker-like.
  9. Bake crackers for 20 minutes (or up to 25 minutes if needed) on parchment paper at 325*F. Let cool before eating, as they will firm up more when fully cool.
  10. Store in an airtight container. (I store them at room temp for a few days or in the fridge for a week or more.)
  11. Makes 6 servings.

AIP Paleo Ranch Crackers - vegan recipe

Shared at: AIP Paleo Recipe Roundtable + Real Food Fridays

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6 thoughts on “AIP Paleo Ranch Crackers

  1. HI Andrea,
    This sounds and looks great – a healthy and tasty alternative to conventional crackers you buy in the store. Thanks for sharing on Real Food Fridays blog hop. Pinned & tweeted!

  2. I think I know the answer to this question already but is there anything that can be substituted for plantain? I have never seen it here. Thanks!

    1. Hi Yvonne!

      I wish I knew another ingredient to swap in for the plantain, but I honestly haven’t experimented with it enough to be able to suggest anything.

      Cheers!
      Andrea

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