Dandelion Root Coffee

Dandelion Root Detox CoffeeI can’t sing high enough praises for how much I appreciate having roasted dandelion root coffee (also referred to as tea) in my life! I have recently starting making my own fresh roasted dandelion coffee every day, and it is resonating with me so well! The dandelion coffee I am making is rich, full bodied, and has a natural sweetness with hints of caramel, without any sugars added. It doesn’t taste exactly like coffee, and that is okay, because I now like it so much more than coffee.

And here is how I got turned on to it. For the past few years I was a fan of Dandy Blend, which is a coffee substitute made with dandelion root, chicory, and a few other ingredients that are processed, freeze dried and turned into a powder that makes a pretty decent instant latte, without any actual coffee in it. But I had run out of Dandy Blend and thought maybe I finally would try making my own dandelion coffee. And oh my, was I missing out!! And while I liked the taste of Dandy Blend, I wasn’t experiencing any of the amazing health benefits like I get from roasting the root myself.

After my first glass of fresh roasted dandelion root coffee I was hooked. And I started to crave it! And I noticed that my body, mind and spirit were feeling especially energized after a week of drinking it. So I went on the internet to read more about this elixir I was making. And I found pages, and pages of stories, studies, and testimonies of extraordinary things that happened when people drank dandelion root tea! Initially I started drinking dandelion root coffee purely for the sake of having a tasty beverage as I can no longer tolerate coffee. I wasn’t expecting any added health benefits from my home brewed dandelion lattes. But I was experiencing benefits, no doubt about that! Below are just a few of the amazing things I have recently discovered about dandelion root tea!

Also note: the whole dandelion plant is quite beneficial, including the bitter leaves, but the root actually gets a lot of credit for helping to heal the body as well!

Dandelion root can help detoxify the liver and promote increased bile production. And it can help with the digestion of fats. This is why I think Dandelion Coffee makes an Excellent base for Bullet Proof Coffee too – I will put up a post for a Bullet Proof Dandelion Coffee too!

Dandelion is a natural diuretic and can help the kidney clear out excess water, waste and salts. The root helps one shed excess water from the body, and is also credited with reliving symptoms of PMS. 

Dandelion is credited with helping relieve the symptoms and swelling around the joints from arthritis and gout.

Dandelion root is credited with promoting good colon health. Dandelion root has a mild laxative effect, and can help one stay regular and help treat constipation.

Dandelion has been shown to reduce inflammation throughout the body. This can relieve pain and swelling. I have personally noticed an added pain relief benefit from drinking my dandelion coffee daily!

Here is a link to information on a cancer study that was funded to explore the use of dandelion root to kill cancer cells. Excerpt from article: ” His team’s first phase of research showed that dandelion root extract forced a very aggressive and drug-resistant type of blood cancer cell, known as chronic monocytic myeloid leukemia, to essentially commit suicide. Researchers then discovered that repeated treatment with low dose dandelion root extract was effective in killing most of the cancerous cells.”

I also find myself being more inspired and in tune with the world around me when I drink this tea daily. In my next life I plan to open up a cafe called the The Dandelion Cafe and serve dandelion coffee and serve cakes made with the dandelion petals. That is how much I am in love with this plant! I recently had a profound shift in my approach to a large project I am working on (which is my cookbook!). Was it because spring had finally arrived and my yard was full of dandelions? I think it’s more than a possibility. ♥

The only thing that first concerned me about adding dandelion root to my daily diet is that the root is high in inulin. Inulin is a prebiotic non-digestible fiber that feeds certain good bacteria in the large intestine, but is also known to feed klebsiella, a gram negative bacteria believed to be at the root of an auto-immune condition I live with called ankylosing spondylitis. But I have only had great results from adding dandelion root to my diet. Maybe it has just the right amount on inulin my body needed to function in better health? I still avoid concentrated manufactured sources of inulin found in products like agave and many probiotics, but I have always tolerated foods like garlic, onions, and asparagus well which also contain inulin. I can’t make any guarantees how others will respond to dandelion root.

So I couldn’t help but search for any information linking dandelion root to ankylosing spondylitis. Because I personally felt a nice improvement in my health after adding it into my diet. And I found this testimony of a man who had severe AS, much like myself, who found a major benefit in drinking the tea! Read the 3rd case study at this link, the one at the bottom.

Here is a link to drugs that may have adverse reactions with dandelion root.

You can obviously read endless testimonies about various drugs, supplements, treatments that people find benefit in to treat disease in their body. And results always vary by person. I am just sharing something that is definitely working well for me, in addition to my low starch diet. ♥ Make Your Own Dandelion Root Detox Tea and Coffee

To Find Them Any Fresher You Would Have To Grow

Dandelion Root Coffee

  1. I like to roast the roots fresh when I make the coffee.
  2. Set a small dry saucepan on the burner over medium high heat.
  3. Turn the oven fan on, this will get a little smokey.
  4. Add the dandelion root pieces to the saucepan, and stir them for a few minutes as they toast.
  5. When they start to turn dark brown and smoke a little, pour in 2 cups of water. (You can add in 3 cups of water if making 2 servings of “hot” dandelion coffee instead of iced.)
  6. Let the water simmer for a few minutes.
  7. Pour into a glass jar, using a strainer like this to separate out the root pieces. (After straining, I usually add additional cup of water to the roasted roots, let it sit in the saucepan together for a few minutes, strain again, and extract additional coffee to enjoy iced later.)
  8. You have just made fresh roasted dandelion root coffee! You can enjoy this beverage hot or cold. I like to serve it over ice, with a splash of coconut milk and a little vanilla extract. If you want to sweeten it, add in honey before pouring over ice.
  9. This recipe makes two cups. You can share with a friend, or put the second cup in the fridge to chill for later. Enjoy this coffee with my homemade dandelion petal cupcakes! They are equally as divine!

**Okay, listen here! The quality of the root you use can make a world of difference in how much you will enjoy the coffee. I have tried roots from a variety of sources, and the only roots I love the taste of are the dried (un-roasted) roots from Mountain Rose Herbs. Get this, I also tried the pre-roasted dandelion root from Mountain Rose Herbs, but it made the most bitter cup of coffee for me, I didn’t care for it. If that had been my first experience with the dandelion coffee, I would have likely never tried it again! I also tried Traditional Medicinal’s Roasted Dandelion Root Tea in the baggies, and eh, not really a fan. So I really recommend ordering the plain dried roots, and roasting them yourself!! Or you can dig them up in your yard and dry them following these directions here. But don’t be fooled by all of the false dandelion and dandelion look-a-likes in your yard. Make sure you are actually picking dandelion which has smooth leaves (no fuzzy hairs), the leaves form pointed lobes much like “lion’s teeth”, the yellow flower is growing on a single stem (not branched with other flower buds), and each flower is attached to a hollow plant stem that can be used as a straw.

Cultivating Herbal Friendships

Make a batch of my Dandelion Petal & Lemon Cupcakes to enjoy with your coffee!

Dandelion and Lemon Paleo Cupcakes - foraging wild dandelions for food - low carb, gluten-free cupcakes recipe http://www.forestandfauna.com/
Make Your Own DandelionRoot Detox Tea and Coffee

Recipe shared at: Happy Healthy Green Natural Party Blog Hop + Paleo AIP Recipe Roundtable + Allergy Free Wednesday + Gluten Free Fridays + Savoring Saturdays

42 thoughts on “Dandelion Root Coffee

    1. Hi Lynn!

      The specific piece of dandelion root I tested for starch content with iodine did not change color, so it passed the test for me. Did you get a chance to read above where I said my biggest concern was actually the high inulin content for those with AS? Again, no issues for me at all there either, and I have been drinking dandelion coffee everyday for a couple months. I have honestly noticed a big improvement as far as eliminating any residual stiffness in my spine and joints. And it has help put the bounce back in my step! Dandelion is such a great detoxifier for the liver, kidneys and body, and I just had no idea how powerful it was until I finally tried it!

      Cheers!
      Andrea

    2. Thanks Andrea. That’s helpful. I do not think inulin is a big problem for me – not sure yet. But I know detoxification is so important. I will try this. Thanks for all your great research and information in addition to your great recipes. Your recipes have actually inspired me to cook more creatively even when I am not following one of them. Your concoctions showed me that healthy, starch -free food can be adventurous and yummy!

    3. Thanks so much for the compliment!! I literally finished my 130+ recipe low starch (mostly starch free) cookbook manuscript today!! I am sending it off to the publisher tomorrow!! Hope to release it on kindle this summer. I can’t wait to share it!!!

      Cheers!!
      Andrea

  1. I love my coffee, but know I need to get away for the healing of my gut. I looked at coffee alternatives (including Dandy Blend and Teeccino Vanilla Nut Coffee Alternative), but the ingredients listed include Rye and Barley. Are these part of the NSD or should I avoid those alternatives due to starch. Thanks!

    1. I drank Dandy Blend for a few years while on NSD, but when I discovered home roasting dandelion root coffee there was no going back. Kinda like comparing instant coffee to dark French roast coffee made in a French Press, one is just better than the other!

      As far as with AS and the ingredients in Dandy Blend, it passed the starch test for me, as the Dandy Blend is made from a freeze dried extract of the roasted roots. I think this is one of those gray areas that really can only be answered by individual trial and error. If you go to the Dandy Blend website you can order a sample for $1 to try it. It’s actually not bad, it’s just that once I upgraded to this DIY version I haven’t looked back.

  2. This is such an informative post! I love all things dandelion (though I can’t say I could ever give up real coffee for it!) I love the earthiness of dandelion tea, and I’ve harvested and roasted my own before… it’s really not that difficult. Pinning! 🙂

    1. Hi Deanna!

      The dandelion leaves are good for juicing or adding a bit of bitter to a stir fry, but the roots I use for coffee are quite different. The dandelion plant stores natural sugar (inulin) in the roots, and they are very firm and fibrous, think of it similar to root veggies like carrots or beets where there is natural sweetness in the root, but a much different flavor and texture in the beet greens and carrot tops. I link above to my favorite source for dried dandelion roots, but you can also dig them up right outta your yard. Cheers!

  3. Just found and tried your recipe today, and it’s delicious! I found the same thing when it came to buying pre-roasted dandelion root – that it was really bitter. I didn’t like the taste without adding enough maple syrup to render it not such a healthy choice, so I just gave up and assumed coffee replacements were not for me. Very glad to have found your recipe and suggestions! ^_^

    1. Hi Cindi!

      Thanks so much for this comment! So awesome to hear you enjoyed the home-roasted homemade version too!! I love the pinch of natural sweetness that comes through when the dandelion coffee is made this way. ♥

    1. Hi Sharon,

      It sounds like you may have an allergy to dandelion root. I would honestly not drink anything that makes me gassey or cramp. Sorry to hear this didn’t work out for you! xx

  4. I mainly wanted to try it bc of chronic constipation and RA imflimation. I don’t want to use anything chemical n my body. I’m 59 yrs old and use nothing chemical. How long does it usually take for it to start helping with that issue? Ty sharon

    1. Hi Sharon,

      Totally, I’m all about the natural approach too!

      I had a great response to dandelion coffee within the first week. Maybe explore some other herbal teas? When I google “teas for constipation” dandelion tea comes up with the top 10, but so does senna tea, peppermint tea, licorice tea.

      You know, another homemade tea I really like is hawthorn tea. You can collect the berry and leaves from a hawthorn tree and dry them or order them in bulk for a fair price from Mountain Rose Herbs. Hawthorn tea is said to be beneficial for the blood and good for fighting inflammation. This article below also listed digestive health (including treating constipation) as a benefit.
      https://www.organicfacts.net/health-benefits/other/health-benefits-of-hawthorn.html

  5. Wow, I was very hesitant about this recipe. Just made it this morning but I made it like bulletproof coffee. I strained the dandelion roots into a blender. Then I added a tablespoon of mct oil, collagen and grassfed butter. Whipped it up and yum. Taste delicious!

  6. This sounds interesting. I have never made it from scratch, but I have bought the tea bags from Traditional Medicinals. I was a bit reluctant to try at first, but it actually tastes really good! Do you buy them, grow them specifically for food purposes or pick them outside (sorry, I didn’t catch that from the post). I haven’t grown them, and I’m afraid to pick them outside due to the prevalence of pesticide usage.

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