Edible Wildflower Salad

There is something so magical about collecting and eating wildflowers that just makes me happy!! How can you not be happy on a cool early summer morning spent outdoors in a field of wildflowers!! And the best thing about the flowers being featured in this edible wildflower salad is the are very likely already growing in your yard! In our yard we’ve got wild pea flowers, Oxeye Daisies, golden California Poppies in bloom right now, and if you don’t have a large yard, you can just as easily collect these flowers in a park or alongside a country road. Just wander in off the road a bit to avoid picking next to the road where they might have sprayed pesticides.

Wildflower Salad Recipe - Edible Wild Pea Flowers - Oxeye Daisies - Foraging  Wildflower Salad Recipe - Edible Wild Pea Flowers - Oxeye Daisies - Foraging

I find the pea flowers to be the most mellow in taste and enjoyable to eat. Second to them would be the Oxeye Daisy leaves for deliciousness, followed by their blossoms for a nice texture. The golden California poppies are pretty bitter, so I only toss a few in for a burst of color, and little pop of bitterness. You can read more about the California Poppy in this post on First Ways.

 

Pictured below is a field of Oxeye Daisies near Silverton, Oregon. Everywhere I look in June and July in Oregon I see Oxeye Daisies in bloom, including our own yard, all along the country roads, and where the sun breaks through the trees in wooded nature parks.

Wildflower Salad Recipe - Edible Wild Pea Flowers - Oxeye Daisies - Foraging

Below you will see the “spatulated” leaves on the Oxeye Daisy that are edible and totally delicious! At the GingerRoot Rendezvous, taught by Dr. John Kallas, I learned about the edibility of the Oxeye Daisy and how to identify the “spatulated” leaves. You’ll notice the leaves flare out like a spatula on the ends, and at the base of the leaf where it attaches to the steam, there is a little plume that flares out like a tiny flame. For more info see this article on how to identify Oxeye Daisies.

Wildflower Salad Recipe - Edible Wild Pea Flowers - Oxeye Daisies - Foraging

Below you can see a pink sea of wild pea flowers in bloom by the Yamhill River, near my hometown of Willamina, Oregon. We also have pea flowers growing wild in our yard, but I found a much larger bounty of them growing near the river. You can also find them along country roads in the summer. Here is a great article on the edibility of wild pea flowers from Hank Shaw.

Wildflower Salad Recipe - Edible Wild Pea Flowers - Oxeye Daisies - Foraging

Edible Wildflower Salad

A summer wildflower salad featuring wild Pea Flowers, Oxeye Daisies, and golden California Poppies.
Author Andrea Wyckoff

Ingredients

  • Wildflower Salad:
  • 6 cups greens (a mix of salad greens from our garden dandelion leaves, and Oxeye Daisy leaves)
  • 3 cups Wild Pea flowers
  • 1 cup Oxeye Daisy flowers
  • 1/2 cup golden California Poppy flowers
  • optional: nasturtiums from the garden wild rose petals, chicory flowers.
  • Cherry Pit Dressing:
  • 1/4 cup light olive oil
  • 2 Tablespoons cherry pit vinegar (flavored with cherry pits see notes)
  • 1 teaspoons to 2 wildflower honey
  • 1/2 teaspoon mustard
  • sea salt & black pepper to taste

Instructions

  1. Important Note: Not all wildflowers are edible, in fact there are some wild flowers that are toxic, like the tiny white blossoms of the deadly Poison Hemlock plant and the toxic Giant Hogweed plant. Always be 100% sure you have identified the right wild plant to eat and enjoy. See my links above in the article for info on how to properly identify each of these edible wildflowers. Once you know how to identify the edible ones, it becomes fun, safe, and delicious!
  2. Collect wildflowers and greens. I love the flavor of the Oxeye Daisy greens in the salad and add in a large handful of dandelion greens too. If picking the flowers the night before, keep the stems in water, just like you would regular cut flowers, until ready to use. (I actually store them chilled in the fridge too.)
  3. Whisk salad dressing together in a small glass, then toss with salad.
  4. Serve.

Recipe Notes

I love the subtle flavors of cherry blossoms that come to life in vinegar when you marinate the cherry pits to make "cherry pit vinegar". See my post for more info on how I make cherry pit vinegar.

Wildflower Salad Recipe - Edible Wild Pea Flowers - Oxeye Daisies - Foraging

Shared at: Real Food FridaysGluten-free Fridays + Allergy Free Thursday + Sunday Fitness & Food Link-up

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Wildflower Salad Recipe - Edible Wild Pea Flowers - Oxeye Daisies - Foraging

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12 thoughts on “Edible Wildflower Salad

  1. Hi Andrea,.
    You know this is just too pretty to eat.Ha! I love this idea, filled with health, and nutrition. What a wonderful idea to eat wildflowers and make a beautiful salad fit for a queen. hanks for sharing on Real Food Fridays. Pinned & tweeted!

  2. HI Andrea,
    Just a note to let you know that I have chosen your post as one of my features for this weeks Real Food Fridays blog hop that goes live every Thursday @ 7pm EST. Thank you for sharing your valuable information with us on Real Food Fridays and helping us to make this world a little bit healthier!

    1. Thank you so much Marla! I am honored! I just had this wildflower salad again today for lunch! A friend and I went out foraging this morning, came home, and made quite the feast. xx

  3. Andrea – I have never tried any of these edible flowers. I would have never thought you can actually eat them. I have learned so much about unique greens on your blog.Thanks for sharing this beautiful and informative post. Pinning and stumbling!

  4. I was under the impression that wild pea a.k.a. sweet pea was poisonous, I know that the pea pods are. I would be very interested in gathering with you. I’ve been into herbal remedies on & off since age 16. I have my husbands phone, I’m well into my 50’s now & have not had knowledgeable gathering partners, I wish to learn more .

    1. Hi Carol!

      Oh wild foraging is so much fun!! If we are ever in the same place at the same time it would be fun to pick a wild feast. ♥

      I don’t think you caught it, but up above in my blog post there is a link to a really informative post about the edibility of wild pea pods written by Hank Shaw. Here is the link again: http://honest-food.net/2013/08/22/the-myth-of-the-poison-pea/

      Going by what I have learned directly in the field from Dr. John Kallas, and also read by Hank Shaw, I do believe the wild pea pods are edible, and I personally love to eat them lightly simmered in water and served with butter.

      In the article I linked to it just emphasizes that it would not be healthy to sustain oneself on a diet made up of 30% or more in wild peas, for a long period of time, but as a side dish here and there it is believed they are perfectly safe as long as one is not allergic to them.

      But I would never encourage anyone to eat a wild plant they are not comfortable eating. Always best to error on the side of caution. ♥

      If you ever get the chance to attend a wild food workshop from Dr. John Kallas I highly encourage going! I always learn so much from his workshops! His website is: http://wildfoodadventures.com/

      xx

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